The Power of Primary Focus

There’s so much going on in our lives nowadays. We seem to be bombarded with information from many sources. How do we shut out the unimportant noise ad really focus on our really key goals?

I use a technique that I’ve developed over time. I call it the power of primary focus. This is all about focusing on the one or two key priorities that move your life forwards.

Let me demonstrate how this works by using the example of a football team (for my friends in the US that’s soccer rather than NFL). A football team is made up of 11 players, plus subs, each with a specific role to play in the team.

Goalkeeper

Midfielders

Attackers

Each of the three groups have their own primary focus during a game, that when combined create the final outcome.

Goalkeeper and defenders primary focus is to prevent the opposition from scoring

The midfielders primary focus is to be the link between defence and attack. In other words they break up the oppositions attacks and create opportunities for their own team’s attackers to score goals.

So whilst each group within the team have their own primary focus the overall primary focus of the team itself is very simple- to score more goals than the opposition. That’s it as simple as that. You score more goals than the opposition then you win.

The power of primary focus is all about controlling the events that you can control and not the external factors that can end up controlling you. It’s about removing excuses and understanding your role. It’s about changing your thinking to what can I do to influence the outcome?

I’ve used an example of a football team to help explain how this works, however this principle applies across all of life’s experiences.

Take a few moments to think – what’s your primary focus right now?

Striving for mediocre is a poor way to achieve greatness

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In my career, both in corporate American and as a Business Coach, I’ve frequently heard otherwise good capable people state a goal to become just like everyone else.  That’s not how it is said, of course.  It is always couched in phrases like, “Best practices are . . . .” or “Both my brothers were able to . . . .” or “The competition typically . . . .”  What follows next is usually a recommendation to achieve the banal, the commonplace and the typical.  People and companies who achieve these bland goals are frequently surprised when they stop, look around and realize that they haven’t achieved any level of greatness.

Yes, it is ok to have “good enough” levels for lower priority goals.  Life is a trade off.  You have enough time and resources to do anything.  You don’t have enough time and resources to do everything.  Manage your…

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